New IRISS Insight: Shaping the criminal justice system

A new Insight entitled, Shaping the criminal justice system: The role of those supported by criminal justice services, has been published.

It focuses on the issue of involving those who have offended in shaping the criminal justice system, exploring the different models of involvement, the effectiveness of different approaches and the implications for Criminal Justice Social Work services.

The Insight was written by Beth Weaver (Glasgow School of Social Work, University of Strathclyde) and Claire Lightowler (IRISS).

This is one of a series of reports providing the social services workforce with brief, accessible and practice-oriented summaries of published evidence on key topics.

You can view and download the Insight on the IRISS website.

3 thoughts on “New IRISS Insight: Shaping the criminal justice system”

  1. This is a helpful and up-to-date overview of (ex)offenders as contributors to better services. I like the way it brings together the different ways in which service users can contribute to shaping better services.

    There is of course a critical distinction to be made between contributions in the form of giving feedback and suggestions about services and contributions in the form of getting involved in providing some of those services themselves. The second category has bigger implications with drawbacks for both sides (e.g. issues of reliability; getting paid) and more radical outcomes in changing perceptions of (ex)offenders and in the effectiveness of supporting the resettlement and ‘reform’ of others.

    One thing that struck me on reading this is the indirectness of the phrase ‘those supported by criminal justice services’, though I appreciate the correctness of it. ‘Service user’ isn’t much better. There has never really been an improvement on ‘client’ in the sense of someone to whom a service is delivered. But when, as in this insight paper, the subject concerns the helped becoming helpers, recipients becoming givers, those who have once ‘done wrong’ now ‘doing good’, then the honest label of ‘ex-offender’ helps bring home the radical shift in role and in perceptions that are at stake.

    Like

  2. This is a useful up-to-date overview of (ex)offenders as contributors to better services. I like the way it brings together the different ways in which service users can contribute to shaping better services.

    There is of course a critical distinction to be made between contributions in the form of giving feedback and suggestions about services and contributions in the form of getting involved in providing some of those services themselves. The second category has bigger implications with drawbacks for both sides (e.g. issues of reliability; getting paid) and more radical outcomes in changing perceptions of (ex)offenders and in the effectiveness of supporting the resettlement and ‘reform’ of others.

    One thing that struck me on reading this is the indirectness of the phrase ‘those supported by criminal justice services’, though I appreciate the correctness of it. ‘Service user’ isn’t much better. There has never really been an improvement on ‘client’ in the sense of someone to whom a service is delivered. But when, as in this insight paper, the subject concerns the helped becoming helpers, recipients becoming givers, those who have once ‘done wrong’ now ‘doing good’, then the honest label of ‘ex-offender’ helps bring home the radical shift in role and in perceptions that are at stake.

    Like

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